Thinking you want a rooster?

Or, did you accidentally get a rooster with your female chicks?

Here’s some things you need to consider…

REMINDER: You don’t have to have a rooster for your hens to lay eggs. So don’t think you NEED a rooster for your laying flock.

My personal rooster experience…

I have had a couple roosters over the years. All of them have been oopses (a male chick shipped with what was supposed to be all females). In each case, I kept the roosters for awhile, but eventually decided they had to go.

The 2 Reasons I Don’t Keep a Rooster

They are loud.

Roosters crow. Although some may find cock-a-doodle-doing a nostalgic early morning alarm, just remember you can’t control the time he’ll go off and there’s no hitting snooze.

Roosters also crow some throughout the day, so prepare yourself for quite a bit of noise. With my smaller acreage, I have some pretty close neighbors and the coop is close to our house as well. In the end, it was just too much noise too early in the morning for our small lot.

And Unpredictably Mean.

Our first rooster started out so sweet. But within a couple months, I was having to carry a shovel into the coop to protect myself. He was just trying to take care of his ladies, but it made daily egg gathering and feeding a dramatic affair.

Plus, I have a lot of people – including families with young kids – out to visit the farm, so I can’t have a cantankerous rooster attacking everyone who comes into the coop.

So, for those two reasons, I don’t keep a rooster.

If you have a larger lot, don’t mind the noise, are blessed with a friendly rooster, don’t have young kids or farm visitors or you really want to breed and hatch your own chicks, then go for it!

But if you’re just getting started with chickens, I do not recommend a rooster. Stick to hens and you’ll have a quieter, more peaceful poultry experience. 

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